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Anônimo
Anônimo perguntou em Sociedade e CulturaIdiomas e Línguas · Há 2 meses

Could you pls help me and explain it with English grammar?

Why did they spend most of their money in Fécamp?

a) they saw no reason to save it

b) the fares to Dieppe were very cheap

c) they knew there would be no emergencies

d) they were leaving early next morning

The Belgian family made their daughter sit in the front of the car because they thought

a) the students were too dirty to sit near

b) the students wouldn’t value her enough

c) the students couldn’t be trusted near her

d) the students were too rude to speak to

Why were the two students surprised to see the lorry?

a) It seemed to be coming from Dieppe

b) No French lorries run at night

c) It was late for a lorry to be running

d) The lorry appeared to be running late

3 Respostas

Classificação
  • Há 2 meses

    ---

    Hi, Claudia:

    ► EXERCISE

    read the following text and choose the correct alternative to answer the questions.

    ►TEXT:

    My first visit to Paris began in the company of some earnest students. My friend and I, therefore, being full of independence and the love of adventure, decided to go off on our own and explore Northern France as hitch-hikers.

    We managed all right down the main road from Paris to Rouen, because there were lots of vegetable trucks with sympathetic drivers. After that we still went along secondary roads to Fécamp, because we fell in with two family men who had left their wives behind and were off on a spree on their own. In Fécamp, having decided that it was pointless to reserve money for emergencies, we spent our francs with great contentment, carefully arranging that we should have just enough left for supper and an overnight stay at the Youth Hostel in Dieppe, before catching the early morning boat. Dieppe was only a few miles away, so we thought it would be a shame to leave Fécamp until late in the afternoon.

    There is a hill outside Fécamp, a steep one. We walked up it, saying to each other as the lorries climbed past us, that, after all, we couldn’t expect a French truck driver to stop on a hill for us. It would have been fine going at the top, if we had got there before the last of the evening truck convoy had passed on its way westwards along the coast. We sat there two and a half hours, and then, less patient, we went further down to a bistro, to have some coffee and ask advice from the proprietor. He told us that there would be no more trucks and explained that our gentlemanly signalling stood not the slightest chance of stopping a private motorist.

    ‘This is the way one does it!’ he exclaimed, jumping into the center of the road and completely barring the progress of a car which contained a Belgian family, who obviously had to stop. We were let into the back seat, after having carefully removed all their objects of value, including their daughter.

    Conversation was not easy, but we were more than content to stay quiet – until the car halted and we learned to our surprise that the Belgians went no farther.

    We walked in what we believed to be the general direction of Dieppe for a long time. It was about 11 p.m. when we ran to a rise in the road and from there we saw, as if it were some mirage, a vast French truck approaching us. My friend sat down by the roadside and hugged his leg, and looked as much like a road accident. I stood in the middle of the road and held my arms out. As soon as the lorry stopped we rushed to either side and gabbled out a plea in poor if voluble French for a lift to Dieppe.

    We reached the Youth Hostel at Dieppe three and a half hours after the doors had been locked. This, in fact, was not true, as we discovered that the door to the washroom was not properly secured, and we were able to make our stealthy way to the men’s dormitory, where we slept soundly.

    ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

    ► QUESTIONS:

    1. Why did they spend most of their money in Fécamp?

    a) they saw no reason to save it

    b) the fares to Dieppe were very cheap

    c) they knew there would be no emergencies

    d) they were leaving early next morning

    2. The Belgian family made their daughter sit in the front of the car because they thought

    a) the students were too dirty to sit near

    b) the students wouldn’t value her enough

    c) the students couldn’t be trusted near her

    d) the students were too rude to speak to

    3. Why were the two students surprised to see the lorry?

    a) It seemed to be coming from Dieppe

    b) No French lorries run at night

    c) It was late for a lorry to be running

    d) The lorry appeared to be running late

    ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

    ► ANSWERS

    1. Why did they spend most of their money in Fécamp?

    a) they saw no reason to save it.

    b) the fares to Dieppe were very cheap.

    c) they knew there would be no emergencies.

    d) they were leaving early next morning. ✔

    NOTES

    There are no grammar rules which account for the answers. This is an exercise to test reading comprehension, so you need to read the text carefully as many times as necessary to understand it, so that you can choose the most appropriate option to answer the questions.

    As regards this particular question, the students spent most of their money in Fécamp because they had decided not to reserve money for emergencies, so they could spend all their money except what they would need for supper and an overnight stay at a hostel in Dieppe. They were going to stay in Fécamp until late in the afternoon before going to Dieppe, where they were going to spend the night and leave early the next morning.

    In the text:

    • In Fécamp, having decided that it was pointless to reserve money for emergencies, 𝐰𝐞 𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐟𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐠𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭, carefully arranging that we should have just enough left for supper and an overnight stay at the Youth Hostel in Dieppe, 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐛𝐨𝐚𝐭. Dieppe was only a few miles away, so we thought it would be a shame to leave Fécamp until late in the afternoon.

    ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

    2. The Belgian family made their daughter sit in the front of the car because they thought

    a) the students were too dirty to sit near.

    b) the students wouldn’t value her enough.

    c) the students couldn’t be trusted near her. ✔

    d) the students were too rude to speak to.

    NOTES

    This isn't specifically said in the text, but we can infer it. The Belgian family didn't know the two students and had no reason to trust them, so they must have thought it was better to protect her valuable possessions and her daughter.

    In the text:

    • ‘This is the way one does it!’ he exclaimed, jumping into the center of the road and completely barring the progress of a car which contained a Belgian family, who obviously had to stop. 𝐖𝐞 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐥𝐞𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐚𝐜𝐤 𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐭, 𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐮𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐨𝐛𝐣𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐯𝐚𝐥𝐮𝐞, 𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐥𝐮𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐝𝐚𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐞𝐫.

    There is a mistake in this sentence:

    • Incorrect: We were let into the back seat, [after having carefully removed]✘ all their objects of value, including their daughter.

    • Correct: We were let into the back seat, after 𝐭̲𝐡̲𝐞̲𝐲̲ 𝐡̲𝐚̲𝐝̲ 𝐜̲𝐚̲𝐫̲𝐞̲𝐟̲𝐮̲𝐥̲𝐥̲𝐲̲ 𝐫̲𝐞̲𝐦̲𝐨̲𝐯̲𝐞̲𝐝̲ all their objects of value, including their daughter.

    This is a dangling participle, which is ungrammatical. A dangling participle is a modifier that doesn't seem to modify anything. It occurs when the word being modified is either left out of the sentence or isn't located near the modifier.

    In other words, if we don't include the subject of the participial clause, it is assumed that it has the same subject as the main clause, which in this sentence is 'we', referring to the students.

    The dangling participle 'after having carefully removed' seems to imply that the students themselves ('we') carefully removed all their objects of value. To fix this, we simply need to add the missing pronoun or noun, such as 'they', 'the family', the members of the family', etc. A corrected sentence, then, might read, 'We were let into the back seat, after they had carefully removed all their objects of value, including their daughter'. This sentence makes it clear that the family removed all their valuable objects, including their daughter, as it has been humorously put.

    ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

    3. Why were the two students surprised to see the lorry?

    a) It seemed to be coming from Dieppe.

    b) No French lorries run at night.

    c) It was late for a lorry to be running. ✔

    d) The lorry appeared to be running late.

    NOTES

    They didn't expect to see any lorries at 11 p.m. because the bistro owner had told them that there would be no more trucks. It was late and the last of the evening trucks had already left Fécamp.

    In the text:

    • There is a hill outside Fécamp, a steep one. We walked up it, saying to each other as the lorries climbed past us, that, after all, we couldn’t expect a French truck driver to stop on a hill for us. It would have been fine going at the top, 𝐢𝐟 𝐰𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐠𝐨𝐭 𝐛̲𝐞̲𝐟̲𝐨̲𝐫̲𝐞̲ 𝐭̲𝐡̲𝐞̲ 𝐥̲𝐚̲𝐬̲𝐭̲ 𝐨̲𝐟̲ 𝐭̲𝐡̲𝐞̲ 𝐞̲𝐯̲𝐞̲𝐧̲𝐢̲𝐧̲𝐠̲ 𝐭̲𝐫̲𝐮̲𝐜̲𝐤̲ 𝐜̲𝐨̲𝐧̲𝐯̲𝐨̲𝐲̲ 𝐡̲𝐚̲𝐝̲ 𝐩̲𝐚̲𝐬̲𝐬̲𝐞̲𝐝̲ 𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐰𝐚𝐲 𝐰𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐚𝐬𝐭. We sat there two and a half hours, and then, less patient, we went further down to a bistro, to have some coffee and ask advice from the proprietor. 𝐇𝐞 𝐭𝐨𝐥𝐝 𝐮𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐧𝐨 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐜𝐤𝐬 and explained that our gentlemanly signalling stood not the slightest chance of stopping a private motorist.

    [...]

    We walked in what we believed to be the general direction of Dieppe for a long time. 𝐈𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝟏𝟏 𝐩.𝐦. 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 we ran to a rise in the road and from there 𝐰𝐞 𝐬𝐚𝐰, 𝐚𝐬 𝐢𝐟 𝐢𝐭 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐦𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐠𝐞, 𝐚 𝐯𝐚𝐬𝐭 𝐅𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐜𝐤 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐮𝐬. My friend sat down by the roadside and hugged his leg, and looked as much like a road accident. I stood in the middle of the road and held my arms out. As soon as the lorry stopped we rushed to either side and gabbled out a plea in poor if voluble French for a lift to Dieppe.

    Cheers. 😊

    ----------------

    .

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  • Anônimo
    Há 2 meses

    My first visit to Paris began in the company of some earnest students. My friend and I, therefore, being full of independence and the love of adventure, decided to go off on our own and explore Northern France as hitch-hikers.

    We managed all right down the main road from Paris to Rouen, because there were lots of vegetable trucks with sympathetic drivers. After that we still went along secondary roads to Fécamp, because we fell in with two family men who had left their wives behind and were off on a spree on their own. In Fécamp, having decided that it was pointless to reserve money for emergencies, we spent our francs with great contentment, carefully arranging that we should have just enough left for supper and an overnight stay at the Youth Hostel in Dieppe, before catching the early morning boat. Dieppe was only a few miles away, so we thought it would be a shame to leave Fécamp until late in the afternoon.

    There is a hill outside Fécamp, a steep one. We walked up it, saying to each other as the lorries climbed past us, that, after all, we couldn’t expect a French truck driver to stop on a hill for us. It would have been fine going at the top, if we had got there before the last of the evening truck convoy had passed on its way westwards along the coast. We sat there two and a half hours, and then, less patient, we went further down to a bistro, to have some coffee and ask advice from the proprietor. He told us that there would be no more trucks and explained that our gentlemanly signalling stood not the slightest chance of stopping a private motorist.

    ‘This is the way one does it!’ he exclaimed, jumping into the center of the road and completely barring the progress of a car which contained a Belgian family, who obviously had to stop. We were let into the back seat, after having carefully removed all their objects of value, including their daughter.

    Conversation was not easy, but we were more than content to stay quiet – until the car halted and we learned to our surprise that the Belgians went no farther.

    We walked in what we believed to be the general direction of Dieppe for a long time. It was about 11 p.m. when we ran to a rise in the road and from there we saw, as if it were some mirage, a vast French truck approaching us. My friend sat down by the roadside and hugged his leg, and looked as much like a road accident. I stood in the middle of the road and held my arms out. As soon as the lorry stopped we rushed to either side and gabbled out a plea in poor if voluble French for a lift to Dieppe.

    We reached the Youth Hostel at Dieppe three and a half hours after the doors had been locked. This, in fact, was not true, as we discovered that the door to the washroom was not properly secured, and we were able to make our stealthy way to the men’s dormitory, where we slept soundly.

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  • Samuel
    Lv 6
    Há 2 meses

    Essas perguntas são referentes a algum texto, não? Precisamos da fonte para poder responder as perguntas, do contrário, podemos escolher qualquer alternativa.

    • ClaudiaHá 2 mesesDenunciar

      Samuel o texto está na resposta, não consegui colocá-lo na cabeçario. Obrigada!

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